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is the arms are coming through egypt in tunnels. coming literally through the country of egypt. the problem is they are coming from iran. in to egypt. in to the tums and in the gaza strip. they are shot from gaza to tel aviv. david lee mentioned today, but tell avive has seen missiles and jerusalem here, tel aviv here. the missiles are going this way. the issue here, this is hamas. hamas is a terrorist organization who are targeting population, civilian population centers within israel. that's why israel is retaliating with so many strikes back to the gaza strip. hezbollah and palestinians are more than willing to violate some geneva act, war crimes targeting the civilians. >> dana: they will. we want bob's take on this. first, listen to president obama who said america does stand with israel. >> there is no country on earth that would tolerate missiles raining down on its citizens from outside its borders. so we are fully supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes. >> dana: that is president obama. of course, the leader of israel has words to say
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
by population? it turns out it's not at all a close call. it's egypt, by a lot. more than one in five people in the middle east is egyptian. it's not the richest country, it's not geographically in the middle, but it is the center of gravity for both population and the politics of that whole blessed region. geographically, more toward the middle of the whole middle east is the nation of israel, comparatively tiny. if you want to understand where the fighting is centered, you have to zoom in even further to a whole different scale to even be able to see what the relevant border is over which this fighting is happening. looking at it in that context, you might ask, what's that giant border right next to this relativity tiny place being fought over? that's egypt. that's the egyptian border right up next to this tiny strip of land where the fighting is happening in gaza. that's why part of why this was such a big deal. egypt and israel shaking hands. thank you jimmy carter. the peace treaty between this important country, the nation of israel. but jimmy carter, it turns out, is not only the only
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 years. they see this as an unjust, as a lopsided conflict, and they want president morsi to do something about it. at the same time mr. morsi has made it clear that he doesn't want to disrupt his alliances with was
's going on with egypt, the united states annually gives roughly $2 billion to egypt and something that senator graham made clear over the weekend is to remind egypt everyone is watching their steps. >> egypt, watch what you do and how you do it. you're teetering with the congress on having your aid cut off if you keep inciting violence between the israelis and the palestinians. >> so is this a big test for morsi to prove not only that they are a partner to the united states, but an ally moving forward? >> well, they have been a treaty ally since '79. there's roughly $2 billion in aid given to egypt every year. $2 billion isn't quite what it used to be. so if this is the one piece of leverage that we have over egypt, that's not going to work. what we -- >> even in an economy that's totally failing and upside down for egypt, it's -- $2 billion is not an incentive to want to play nice? >> i don't think that it is the only factor that will get mohamed morsi to be an honest broker in the region. i think it's much -- it would be a much better bet to appeal to his sense of wanting to be
leadership and leadership in egypt to try and come up with a truce, one that she describes as being durable. shannon? >> shannon: we'll talk more with the panel about that, david. thank you. the violence in the middle east is stealing thunder from president obama's asian visit and interrupting outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton's farewell tour. here is chief white house correspondent ed henry. >> secretary of state hillary clinton plunged right in to the last minute shuttle diplomacy. rushing from campodea to jerusalem. to meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid. and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> after a short rest, clinton will now head to ramallah early wednesday to meet with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm sw
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as police use tear gas this morning to disburse protesters in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term
to create a moral equivalency. i think a ground war is obviously going to test where is egypt, where is turkey. we know where iran is. they are arming the hamas, missiles or a lot of them seem to come out of iran. in essence, it seems to me that something pro joked by iran and encouraged by egypt and turkey by immediately taking the side of hamas which is extraordinary. >> greta: so, with hamas in order to get them to step down from its firing rockets into israel and doing provocative, take at hamas. why in the world they are going reach with truce. they are consumed with hatred toward israel. they were very tight and close to iran. today they identified six people who they felt were conspiring with the israelis. they executed them and dragged one body through the streets. they used civilians as shields. where in the world is if i do strike a temporary deal, why in the world would you ever think it would stick or hold? >> you would have to be totally unrealistic. the secretary-general's comments everybody should show restraint is absurd. if somebody lobbed 130 bombs on new york we wo
and breaking news. jon: there are massive protests in egypt right now against president mohammed morsi's latest power grab. as anger grows the muslim brotherhood announces plans for its own demonstration. >>> police combing a million dollar mansion for clues after a violent home invasion. >>> plus there is still time to try your luck as the powerball jackpot hit as record 500 million smackers. it is ail "happening now." jon: think if that half a billion buck is not enough to touch the national debt. jenna: i like when you say smackers. that gets us into the lottery. jon: day two of crucial meetings on capitol hill. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. susan rice is meeting with support bob corker of tennessee. she just wrapped up talks with susan collins of maine. that topic is benghazi. what did ambassador rice know about the terror attacks on the u.s. consulate that killed four americans on september 11? she faced a lot of criticism for comments made in the days following the attacks blaming it on a demonstration that got out of hand. by the way she wasn't the only one. that is something we h
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
, hezbollah fired nearly 4,000 rockets in israel and claimed an upgrading of arsenal since. and now to egypt and the situation we've been keeping an eye on there. at this hour, the u.n. state department with a new warning for americans inside he egypt and our embassy in cairo vazing them to avoid large clouds there and the embassy reporting protesters are pelting nearby police guarding with molotov cocktails and all of this is a backlash against morsi escalating reports tonight of one person killed and another injured on attacks on muslim brotherhood north of cairo and the muslim brotherhood morsi's political party and angered many opposition activist was a power grab, and giving himself near absolute control of egypt. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo. he understands you're in tahrir square? >> reporter: harris, that square behind me, as you can see from our live pictures, more tents have sprung up as the evening has gone on and those protesters say they are there to say we're hearing some small explosions and tear gas after three nights of protests here, skirmishes, and at
be able to do this. bear in mind, this is not the egypt of hosey you in barrack. the egyptian government now are muzz lum brotherhood, and israel is in a less-tenable negotiating position and they remain military strong but do they want to go in on the ground take hundreds of thousands of casualties? that they've within boehnered will cause them to lose the international support they have. it's one of those 50-50 chance things but it's looking like everybody is looking fair way out. the question is, in a region like this, is there a way out. >> schieffer: well allen pizzey, who always shows up in the worst place where's the workforce things are going on, thank you. cbs news correspondent charlie dag tais on the other side of the border in gaza. charlie, bring us up to speed. what is the situation like there. >> reporter: well, the mood here is extremely teps, and the biggest worry is this dangerous and unpredictable situation may be about to get worse. as we drove through the northern part gaza strip, we were shown a couple of bombed out buildings, and one looked to be three or four stor
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
that is critical is because egypt is involved profoundly in this problem. morici, the new le elely electe president of egypt, is in the muslim brothers. the muslim brothers and hamas are directly related. this is about egypt and the 1979 peace treaty. >> right. i'm going to get back to the whole issue of the spreading war. but i'm just real interested in the assessment, ambassador williamson, welcome back, that israel can just inflict massive, permanent damage on hamas and their alleged military. >> well, larry, first of all, i think it's really important to take a step back. we've been involved in a presidential election that sucked up the oxygen. hamas is a group that's recognized as a terrorist organization by the u.s. government, the israeli government and the european union, has increased shelling in areas of israel over recent weeks. they now have shelled tel aviv and 180 missiles went into southern israel. so israel for its own self-defense, its right of self-defense is organizing, rallying more reserve troops, getting ready for more permanent action. it can and should do what's necessary to
hillary clinton is in cairo this morning working to make that peace happen. can egypt help bring an end to the fighting? and back at home, all eyes on the white house for a thanksgiving tradition. the presidential turkey pardon. get ready to gobble up the history of this bird watch. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 21st, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert filling in for the great chuck todd. a commuter bus exploded in central tel aviv injuring at least 19 people steps away from the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo
pictures now. cairo, egypt, tahrir square. and thousands of people are refusing to go home. they are angry at their president. they say he's made himself a dictator. it's quiet now in cairo. it's just after 2:00 a.m., but it definitely was not quiet earlier in the day. listen. tear gas filled the air and crowds of protesters scattered when riot police tried to break up the protests in cairo. we have reports of demonstrators trying to break into the offices of the president's party, the muslim brotherhood. and at least one person reportedly died today in the street violence, a teenager. cnn's reza sayah spent much of the day right in the middle of the chaos in cairo. >> we keep seeing these clashes between protesters and police, protesters throwing rocks at police. police responding by firing tear gas and stun grenades. we're just a few blocks away from tahrir square. we should point out most of these protesters are young men, 20-something, teenagers, hard to say if they're here fighting for democracy or here to cause some trouble. those were chants of down with president mo
where america's allegiance is. test for mohammed morsi in egypt. a test for the turks. the turkish prime minister came out and said israel is terrorist group, not hamas. so they are feeling this out. in my opinion, they are feeling out what would happen if it were israeli-iran and i think it's -- we should be concerned here. the middle east is not siding with the right sides now. >> dana: what about that, bob, when the turkish prime minister says that israel is the terrorist state? does that surprise you? >> bob: it doesn't surprise me because turkey is having a massive internal conflict between muslims and the secular community and the muslim community. but they still have the most stable and necessary of all countries in the area. it would be necessary to have it work. one of the things -- i want to give netanyahu some credit here for showing some restraint. you mentioned this yesterday and i think in the face of this, they have shown a lot of restraint. one thing they need to do is what the gazans want to get the blockade lifted on the sea ports. israel is in control of them. i think
, the newly installed president of egypt, mohamed morsi, trying to encourage them to engage with hamas. of course, hamas is classified technically with the u.s. government as a terrorist organization, there are no formal ties, trying to engage hamas to stop this rocket attack to come to some sort of solution so cooler heads can prevail, mara. >> one of the things in terms of the political issue here, the president in the past has been criticized for not being strong enough in his support of israel. do you get the response in washington that his response now is significant in satisfying people who would like for him to express stronger support for israel? >> you know, there has been some controversy, some tension, frankly, between prime minister netanyahu and the president. that's no secret. there was the recent episode where the prime minister went before the united nations andrew that red line, you remember, across that little cartoon bomb. some disagreement about when and where that red line should be drawn with respect to iran's nuclear program. but look, there is no question that a
have added on to that the arab spring, which gave us new leadership in egypt. how scary is this that mohammed morsi will be a source for good. >> clearly they have a right to defend themselves, and they have to protect their citizens. we have to remember the united states it's as if washington d.c. was being attacked from the state of maryland. it's very, very serious what's happening there. i think as far as the arab spring, clearly the environment has changed, and i think the united states now is looking to morsi so look to hamas to get them to stop shooting. hopefully you can take advantage of the negative situation and start talking about peace. >> president morsi has his own problems at home too in terms of trying to be tough on hamas, which, after all, is part of the muslim brotherhood and the palestinians. do you think he can be helpful? has he been helpful? >> i don't know that he has. clearly we've benefitted from almost 40 years now of having peace partners between israel and egypt even though the egyptian government never told the people of egypt how important
in egypt. so that's where i think everybody would like to see it head. obama has worked hard to talk to them to try to steer it in that direction. will that happen? >> the most phones call that secretary clinton has made from the road have been to her counter-part in egypt. and they have been very clear that egypt has a relationship, they have the credibility and influence in the region to push hamas to stop the attacks. now, there is also a fair amount of funding being held up in washington right now that the egyptians need very immediately. remember, they weren't just one of the top recipients of foreign aid. they have a funding crisis. they have literally been to the point where they have had problems paying bills. so there is some immediate leverage to gets them to act immediately. whether that ends up being effective or not is another question. >> schieffer: well, do we think the administration-- obviously, i would guess they're advising the israelis not to invade. but what beyond that are they trying to do? is this an opening to start a-- the peace process to get it started aga
from egypt in 30 ad. nearly every religion, islam, buddhism, hinduism they have the fascination with the apocalypse. christians prophesize about the end of time and the holy scripture. lauren green reports. ♪ 6. >> reporter: christians mark the end of time in the final chapter of the new testament the book of revelation. chapter 11 verse 18 reads, now is the time to destroy those who destroy the earth. >> book is not about destruction. it's not about the wrath of god. it is about consequences. >> reporter: mark translated the book from the original greek text. he collaborated with hollywood writer to publish a graphic novel to help readers visualize the final chapter. >> we are trying to get people to see the book of revelation in a new way, not just read it but see it. all we're trying to do is present it in the full message of hope in god and hope for the future. >>> how likely john would have been concerned about the end times? >> if he was the last 12 disciples of jesus, she church that is expecting the lord to come back but he hasn't yet. there is a yearning in the commun
we should be thankful for when it comes to the political world. and egypt's muslim brotherhood. the cease-fire deal betweend evf israel and hamas. we have that coming up next. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> more breaking news and developing stories on a brand-new hour on "happening now." >> a new holiday spending bonanza. americans are feeling more confident about our economy. will lead to the great of growth, and what could set us back? >> also, an arrest in a string of murders in new york city connected to one gunman. what we are learning about the man that police in new york city say was poised to strike again. and a large bird crashes through the cockpit plane of this airport. details of the scare in the air for the pilot and passengers. it's all "happening now." >> but first, the cease-fire truce may be fragile, but it appeals to be holding. i am heather childers in for jenna lee. >> and i am rick scott in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed mo
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
as rockets continue to fill the air over israel and gaza and a planned cease fire, visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister may not be holding up. senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in the middle of it all. she has more for you from gaza city. >> reporter: what is happening on both sides of the gaza/israel border looks and feels like war to anyone who has to live with it, no matter what the governments on either side have declared. this is a small taste of what it fe felt like in gauza over a 24-hor period. >> that is exactly -- all right. i'm going to move out of the way and let you get a look here. i'm going to let you get a lock at what is going on. i can see the black smoke. it's difficult to capture on camera. you saw that flash. this is what we have been dealing with all day. we've also been dealing with -- i'm sorry, the power has just gone out. we have been dealing with power outages, wolf. this feels like war. it may not have been declared, but it feels like war to the civilians who live here. >> the booms and smoke from targeted air strikes from morning till night
. now to egypt where the country's new president is winning big-time praise from the u.s. for helping to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the ne
through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we
that country. in egypt a scene of devastation at a railroad crossing after a train hit a bus caring kindergarten students. the government says 49 children are dead, 18 others hurt. >>> back in this country, the coast guard is still searching for two oil rig workers after yesterday's explosion and fire on a platform in the gulf of mexico. >>> a 20-year-old missouri man is facing charges for an admitted plot to want a shooting spree at a theater showing the new twilight movie. the man's mother contacted police after she discovered he bought weapons like the ones used in the colorado movie theater massacre. >>> nfl great mike ditka say his doctors say he suffered a very minor stroke. ditka was playing cards yesterday when he suddenly had trouble speaking and using his hands. espn analyst says he feels good right now and it's not a big deal. and those are your fast five headlines. >>> we have this breaking news. israel and gaza exchange rocket fire for the fourth straight day. new video from the ground in gaza shows the damage from the israeli warplanes and other missiles. the warplanes
, all over the middle east has changed dramatically, in the last year, egypt is no longer one by a pro-american dictator but leaders of the muslim brotherhood. should president obama put more pressure on the egyptian government, even threaten to cut off aid, to get hamas to stop firing those rockets? >> he needs to exert every kind of pressure he can, chris to try to make sure it doesn't escalate into a full-blown war between the palestinians and the israelis and, whatever that takes. but, you know, the problem the israelis have is that these rockets are being fired on them, from places that they can't reach by flying over in the air and they are putting them in school yards where they are surrounded by schoolchildren and firing them from marketplaces crowded with people. and, israel has a right to protect itself. and, if sending ground troops in is the only way they can clean out these nests of rockets being fired at them, you know, you can't blame them for doing it. >> chris: all right, let's turn to benghazi. both of you held closed-door hearings this week with top administration of
of state hillary clinton is in egypt. earlier she met with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and prime minister netanyahu and had this to say. >> america's commitment to israel is rock solid and unwavering. the rocket attacks from terrorist organizations inside gaza on israeli cities and towns must end and a broader calm restored. gregg: general jack keane is a four star general retired. general, great to see you. this is shuttle diplomacy. she has been in jerusalem, ramallah, now cairo. can a cease-fire be brokered here? >> i don't think she would be here unless they believed a cease-fire can be obtained. i also believe she is here because they had legitimate concerns about netanyahu going on the ground in gaza. >> what does hamas wants out of this? >> they want open borders, access to those borders in a way they don't have them now. they want the naval blockade removed. they want a significant improvement in trade. >> reporter: wouldn't that facilitate even more smuggling of rockets into gaza most of them made by iran. >> they are pushing them through africa, into the sinai, and that
. they are willing to defend their territory with their lives. in egypt the focus has shifted a bit because politicians are trying to broker a cease-fire or truce between israel and palestinian factions. there are sticking points but there are signals or at least some early signs that a truce may be on the horizon that would be welcome news for people certainly in gaza and also in israel. back to you. >> thank you so much for that. reporting through the weekend and today from gaza. oil prices rising as fighting between israel and hamas does continue. could this be the beginning of a bigger price pop and where should you park your money in the complex? we have the senior energy analyst at raymond james. good morning to you. >> thanks for having me. >> the conventional wisdom last week is because it doesn't directly involve iran, maybe the impact on the complex not as dire as it might be under other scenarios. do you agree with that? >> there should be no impact at all from what's happening currently on the israel/gaza border. none whatsoever. the reality is that the oil market is very jitter
. >> -- with the president of egypt. >> don't you? >> absolutely. >> last word, steve. how important -- >> let's be clear -- >> always had the deal between israel and egypt in the interest of both countries and our country. can we keep that deal? is there some architecture for peace there? >> we're going to try to keep that deal absolutely, but, remember, we're complicit in part of what happened. obama when he took george mitchell's resignation and basically moved dennis ross out of the white house, he doesn't put a new program on the table. and when america walks away from this peace process or an effort to bring the two sides together and really lay out a plan, violence kicks up. so we have a bit of complicity, and you are seeing right now not a strategic presidency from obama but a reactive presidency, and that doesn't bode well for this. >> do you agree with that? if you're not moving forward, you're moving backwards on the peace treaty, the peace process? >> i think you plod forward or stay -- i'm not sure it's unraveling. i still think the amazing thing about all of the changes in the middle east i
of the next 10 years. judith came across one day this thing called the egypt influence network, a depiction around the time that mubarak fell. and if you google it, it is this blog of blue, red and purple circles. the blue are people treating in english. the red people in arabic, those in both languages come in the google executive is right in the heart of this. so having become one of the state department's more avid twitter is, i do fair number of followers including the middle east that if you look at the map, i was often the fringe. i was on the map, but not really in the middle of the conversation. that is the challenge is the technology does provide the opportunity to get in the middle of a conversation and probably the good news is the evolution from which happened under judas watched of the center for strategic counterterrorism communication, with a purposely go in and insert themselves into extreme chat rooms to generate a debate and to try to change, for lack of a better term, hearts and minds, or engage in the competition judith was talking about. so there is an opportunity here,
would be between israel and iran. this has people paying attention. >> this is a test from egypt and the change in government and they're saying i think hamas is saying how much support are we going to get from them? this is a test of the new middle east and how much support they get and we'll see. morsi is in a difficult place because the egyptian economy is not doing well. they need tourism, it's fallen completely down. the moderate elements in egypt are saying let's get on the economy here and the radical elements are saying support hamas, and this is going to be a real test of his leadership. >> this is the sort of situation that makes you think twice about your forecast for where the dow heads if something were to expand from this? >> yeah, i mean, well, the only good thing is there's no oil in gaza, egypt or israel really. steve is saying if it's a conflagration in the entire mideast, obviously we're not energy independent yet, trying to get there. i don't think it's going to get that far. i think they're testing the political waters here and seeing how we position ourselve
relations between egypt and israel. that doesn't necessarily though still knock on to the oil trade, does it? >> no, it really doesn't. that's what we have to keep watching. the bad word we don't want to hear is iran, obviously. iran is going to give missiles, that's a given. the question is what does iran do, if they poise troops, it will open up completely and it gives israel all it needs and they will attack and attack hard in iran. >> the qe 4 may be on the cards for next year, are you disappointed that it hasn't done more for the markets? >> they did a good job last time in starting to go after the housing market, the problem is they can't just throw a qe-4 out there, it has to be a pinpoint target, change lending standards, make things happen, get congress together. what about infrastructure? we don't hear a word about it. so i think what the fed is going to do, they'll say we'll do something, but get congress to act, the election is over, now get together and do your job. >> to the up side, what levels are you looking at for wti and brent? i think the react sthun to yesterday's move w
between egypt and yemen. i think we know that saudi arabia had mixed feelings about how quickly mubarak was dumped, and -- but they also, the saudis playeded a crucial role of easing yemen. it was not easy. it was slow. it was bloody, but compared to the other changes, it was not that bad. in april of to 20* -- 2011, just as the arab spring was in full bloom, if you will, the c7 finance ministers met in france and formed a partnership with the vision that was simple that europe had been through this kind of thing before. after eastern europe broke away
management >>> u.s. election is certainly making headlines around the world today from egypt to europe. our reporters are fanned across the globe with reaction. >> i'm ben wedeman in cairo. most egyptians seem to prefer barack obama over mitt romney. many of them saying they thought the republicans are simply too pro israeli. but for most egyptians, there is so much going on in this country after the revolution, what with a faltering economy, and an uncertain political future. >> reporter: i'm fred platkin in berlin, germany. germans are by and large happy with the outcome of the election. barack obama would have gotten 90% of the vote here in this country. >> reporter: i'm reza sayah in pakistan. four years ago many here supported mr. obama. not the case this year. many wanted change. they wanted mr. romney and that's because they still don't like u.s. policy in the region, especially the drone strikes. >> americans have weighed in on several important ballot initiatives. take a look at this. for the first time voters in maine approved a measure giving same sex couples the right to marry.
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